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style='margin-left:120.0pt;text-indent:-120.0pt;tab-stops: 120.0pt;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none'> <o:p>&nbsp;</o:p> </p> <div align=center> <table class=MsoNormalTable border=0 cellpadding=0 width=625 style='width:468.75pt; mso-cellspacing:1.5pt;mso-yfti-tbllook:1184;mso-padding-alt:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <tr style='mso-yfti-irow:0;mso-yfti-firstrow:yes;mso-yfti-lastrow:yes'> <td style='padding:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <table class=MsoNormalTable border=0 cellpadding=0 width=625 style='width:468.75pt;mso-cellspacing:1.5pt;mso-yfti-tbllook:1184; mso-padding-alt:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <tr style='mso-yfti-irow:0;mso-yfti-firstrow:yes;mso-yfti-lastrow:yes'> <td valign=top style='padding:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <p class=MsoNormal><span style='mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'><a href="http://www.dickinson.edu/magazine"><span style='text-decoration:none; text-underline:none'><img border=0 width=147 height=147 id="_x0000_i1025" src="http://www.dickinson.edu/magazine/graphics/DClogo.gif"><img border=0 width=426 height=124 id="_x0000_i1026" src="http://www.dickinson.edu/magazine/graphics/magazineLogo.gif" alt="Dickinson Magazine"></span></a><o:p></o:p></span></p> </td> </tr> </table> <p class=MsoNormal><span style='mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; display:none;mso-hide:all'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p> <table class=MsoNormalTable border=0 cellpadding=0 width=625 style='width:468.75pt;mso-cellspacing:1.5pt;mso-yfti-tbllook:1184; mso-padding-alt:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <tr style='mso-yfti-irow:0;mso-yfti-firstrow:yes'> <td valign=top style='padding:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <table class=MsoNormalTable border=0 cellpadding=0 width="100%" style='width:100.0%;mso-cellspacing:1.5pt;mso-yfti-tbllook:1184; mso-padding-alt:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <tr style='mso-yfti-irow:0;mso-yfti-firstrow:yes;mso-yfti-lastrow:yes'> <td style='padding:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'>Volume 86 Number 1</span><span style='mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'><o:p></o:p></span></p> </td> <td style='padding:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <p class=MsoNormal align=right style='text-align:right'><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'>Summer 2008</span><span style='mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'><o:p></o:p></span></p> </td> </tr> </table> <p class=MsoNormal><span style='mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p> <table class=MsoNormalTable border=0 cellpadding=0 width="100%" style='width:100.0%;mso-cellspacing:1.5pt;mso-yfti-tbllook:1184; mso-padding-alt:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <tr style='mso-yfti-irow:0;mso-yfti-firstrow:yes'> <td width="80%" style='width:80.0%;padding:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <p class=MsoNormal><strong><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'>Faculty Retirement Citations</span></strong><span style='mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'><o:p></o:p></span></p> </td> <td rowspan=2 style='padding:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <p class=MsoNormal><span style='mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'>&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr style='mso-yfti-irow:1'> <td style='padding:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <p class=MsoNormal><em><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'>Read tributes to emeriti professors Leon Fitts, Gisela Roethke and Janet Wright</span></em><i><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'><br> <em><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></em></span></i><span style='mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'><o:p></o:p></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr style='mso-yfti-irow:2'> <td colspan=2 style='padding:0in 0in 0in 0in'></td> </tr> <tr style='mso-yfti-irow:3;mso-yfti-lastrow:yes'> <td colspan=2 style='padding:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <table class=MsoNormalTable border=0 cellpadding=0 align=right width=210 style='width:157.5pt;mso-cellspacing:1.5pt;mso-yfti-tbllook:1184; mso-table-lspace:2.25pt;mso-table-rspace:2.25pt;mso-table-anchor-vertical: paragraph;mso-table-anchor-horizontal:column;mso-table-left:right; mso-table-top:middle;mso-padding-alt:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <tr style='mso-yfti-irow:0;mso-yfti-firstrow:yes'> <td style='padding:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <p class=MsoNormal align=center style='text-align:center'><span style='mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'><img border=0 width=200 id="_x0000_i1027" src="http://www.dickinson.edu/magazine/photos/fitts.jpg" alt="click for larger view"><o:p></o:p></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr style='mso-yfti-irow:1;mso-yfti-lastrow:yes'> <td style='padding:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'>Leon Fitts</span><span style='mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'><o:p></o:p></span></p> </td> </tr> </table> <p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'>&nbsp;&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p> <h2><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"'>Praising the Classical Legacy of Leon Fitts<o:p></o:p></span></h2> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>By Daniel J. Heisey  88 <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>In 1791, Charles Nisbet wrote to a friend in Scotland about the influence in America of the French Revolution. Nisbet complained that,  our public Men are Lawyers, Merchants &amp; Farmers who have studied the pleasant art of Money-catching with Success, and that among them,  a few Scraps of Voltaire, Montesquieu, Hume &amp; Rousseau are reckoned a complete Education here. In contrast, Nisbet, stalwart follower of John Calvin, placed himself in the tradition of Christian humanism.  I do not forget Seneca nor St. Paul, he wrote,  &amp; take more notice of both of them than they did of one another at the Court of Nero, tho the Roman Catholics produce many of their Letters. Here Nisbet touches upon a belief common throughout the Middle Ages, that Seneca and Paul exchanged a series of letters. This belief formed the scholarly consensus until the hoax was pointed out by Erasmus. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>This letter from Nisbet comes to mind as word spreads of the imminent retirement of Leon Fitts, Asbury J. Clark Professor of Classical Studies at Dickinson. When first I heard of this epochal event, I thought,  Impossible; he s only in his forties! Then it sank in: Fitts was reckoning his age as forty-something during the presidency of Ronald Reagan. <em><span style='font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"'>Tempus fugit</span></em>, indeed. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Twenty-odd years ago it was my privilege to study under Leon Fitts. Many happy memories pass in review before me, and so I offer a few of them. If they rely too heavily upon the past tense and thus take on the tone of an obituary, it is in no small part because my recollections are of a vanished time. It was a time before PowerPoint and e-mail, when many people still had rotary phones and only four channels on their television. Although that world is long gone, Leon Fitts is still very much with us. So, if what follows sounds too much like a eulogy, let us keep in mind the literal meaning of that Greek term, a good word, or, something spoken in praise. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Mention of Erasmus makes me add that for those of us learning Latin and Greek at Dickinson in the 1980s, Fitts was part of a team. In the classics department, next door to Fitts was Robert Sider, quietly, meticulously translating the New Testament scholarship of Erasmus. Sider had an Oxonian s precision with language and a Canadian s polite but firm way of reminding us that there were people north of the Great Lakes, people with their own country, living quite content, thank you very much. Across the hall from Fitts and Sider were Philip Lockhart and Mary Moser. Lockhart had found the department consisting of two professors and made it one of four, and he captivated us, not least by having a quotation or anecdote for every occasion. Like us, Mary Moser had studied in the department, and so in a way she seemed like an older sibling. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Those four professors, anchored around their indefatigable secretary, Barbara McDonald, helped make the department seem like a family. All five seemed to have plenty of time for commiseration and advice, as well as much-needed correction. When Mary Moser passed away, in her forties, it was Leon Fitts who called to tell me. By that time, Fitts and I were neighbors in Carlisle. I saw him often, and on those occasions, many times related to my work in the county courthouse, I heard from him political and cultural observations that could easily have come from Charles Nisbet. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>What I remember Fitts teaching us, while he taught us the history of ancient Greece and Rome, was that we share a common humanity with Pericles and Augustus, with Xenophon and Cato. He taught us to recognize traits that mark human society, whether it be in the days before the Trojan War or right now. That is, humans live in groups, usually settled, they fall in love, rear children, grow crops, engage in trade, play games, worship gods, fight wars, and they sing songs and tell stories about all of those activities. Sometimes those stories are pretty tall tales, other times they shock with a realism that could come from the nightly news. For Fitts, give him Homer and Thucydides, Catullus and Sallust over the nightly news any day. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Moreover, what remains in the mind is Fitts as a man without ambiguity. One first encountered his direct approach in what came across as a gruff, at times crotchety persona. Fulmination and fist pounding were part of the performance. Yet, this ebullient energy was born of love for his discipline and for his students. His enthusiasm for classical antiquity, and for sharing it with others, fills my memories of the man. His enthusiasm, like the man himself, seemed larger than life. His booming voice, west Texas accent proudly retained, his bursting into song, his passion for pasta and salad and wine, all conjured up a Mediterranean figure, like Odysseus strangely off-course, somehow landing in Pennsylvania Dutch country by way of the desert southwest. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>One year he began his introductory lecture with the caveat that he tended to use blunt terms, many of them made up of four letters.  So, if any of ya ll are offended, he explained,  just raise your hand, here he paused,  and I ll ask you to leave the room. Laughter all around. Nevertheless, the former football player who minced no words was only part of the man. For all the Falstaffian gusto of a man who loved to cook, to bicycle, and to play tennis and golf, here also was a Rotarian, a loving husband, a regular churchgoer, a sensitive scholar of the classics. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Now, in the sort of plot twist Fitts taught us to expect from history (truth being stranger than fiction), I find myself a teaching brother in a Benedictine monastery. Some years ago, Fitts spent a year at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge; he had enjoyed many summers excavating sites from the days of Roman Britain. Much to my happy surprise, my abbot sent me to study at Cambridge, and although my college was Saint Edmund s, not Corpus Christi, I kept thinking,  This is where Fitts walked. He, of course, would have been the first to remind me,  This is where Thomas Cranmer and Erasmus walked. True, but my list will always include Fitts. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Once back from Cambridge, my abbot assigned me to teach Church history in our seminary. Faced with the daunting task of teaching three courses meant to cover two thousand years of history, I dithered until it struck me to ask,  How would Fitts do it? Fitts, of course, is inimitable, but his basic approach can serve as a model. For Fitts, if history wasn t fun, you weren t doing it right. What a less bold teacher could have drained of all life and color, Fitts unfurled before us in vivid images, always interesting yet never clowning. Fun came from the inherent fascination found in the story itself, passed on to us with infectious delight. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>At the risk of saying more about me than about Fitts, let me add that another one of my assignments is to teach our novice monks about the classical tradition. Benedictines like to congratulate themselves for having saved the ancient classics, copying out the manuscripts century after century throughout the Middle Ages. Sadly, since so few people now study the classics, to say nothing of the liberal arts in general, most young monks couldn t say what it was our spiritual ancestors had saved. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>While trying to hand on what is humanizing about the humanities, I wish Fitts were there instead, if only he were allowed into the cloister. He would not hesitate to tell the novices that,  that man who is incapable of being charmed with the beauties of nature and those just descriptions of them which we find in the classics, or who cannot be moved with grandeur, beauty, harmony, and proportion, may be said to be a stone or a barbarian rather than a man. The words, as taken down by one of his students, are those of Charles Nisbet, but they could equally be those of Leon Fitts.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><em><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Daniel J. Heisey, Class of 1988, is a Benedictine monk of Saint Vincent Archabbey, Latrobe, Pennsylvania, where he is known as Brother Bruno.</span></em><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'><o:p></o:p></span></p> <h2><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"'>Tribute to Leon Fitts, Dickinson College Faculty Meeting, May 15, 2008 <o:p></o:p></span></h2> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Leon Fitts arrived at Dickinson as an assistant professor of Classical Studies in 1972 and retires in 2008 as the Asbury J. Clark Professor of Classical Studies. He returns today after a sabbatical spent in his new home in Augusta, Georgia, where Mary, his wife of 45 years, grew up and where they have chosen to retire. Leon is perhaps best known to most faculty as Marshal of the College, the jovial yet dignified juggernaut at the front of the pack for the last twenty-three years of his Dickinson career. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>A Greek historian by training, Leon graduated from Baylor University, then the University of Georgia, and finally Ohio State, where he received the PhD in 1971 with a thesis on  The Political Attacks on Pericles Friends. Shortly after arriving at Dickinson, however, he did what few in this allegedly interdisciplinary day would venture to do at that stage of career. He retrained himself for a quite different scholarly specialty Roman archaeology. In this field he has published a series of important articles and reports dealing with the Romano-British sites of Stanwick, Rockcastle, Melsonby, Traprain Law, as well as the fundamental book on the British tribe the Brigantes and their relations with the Romans, published with Brian Hartley in 1988. Beginning in 1976 he directed, in collaboration with British colleagues, excavations at the sites just mentioned and others, with such distinction that he received in 1996 the extremely rare honor for an American scholar of being elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London. He was also inducted into the Scottish equivalent in 2004. His teaching and mentoring of students has been recognized by the Ganoe Award for Inspirational Teaching, which he received in 1977, as well as by his being made godfather to many of his ex-students children. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>The record of scholarship, teaching, and service to the college is impressive, all the more so since it seems that his true destiny, by birth and by physical endowment, was to play football. A native of Sweetwater in the great state of Texas, the future Professor Fitts started playing organized football in the third grade, so that by his senior year in a Triple-A Texas high school he was a 220 lb All-State tackle. Somewhere around 30 colleges and universities made him offers, schools such as the University of Oklahoma and Dartmouth, but strangely not my own alma mater, UT Austin, a fact that inspired his lifelong distrust of the Longhorns. In fact it is a miracle I was hired with that handicap. Leon ultimately chose Rice, where he made the All-Southwest Conference freshman team. Soon, however, he became disenchanted with big time college football.  It was fun in high school, he recalled to a <em><span style='font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"'>Dickinsonian</span></em> reporter,  but when I got to Rice, I found that football was just a big business. I had a contract to do a job. The fun was gone. He decided to quit playing and start studying, and transferred to Baylor to prepare for the ministry. That s where he began studying Greek. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Football; God; what other callings were there for a Texan of Leon s gifts? Well, the oil business, in which he spent a year as a trainee after graduating from college. Some will say that Leon never abandoned the ministry, but merely exchanged the pulpit for the lectern. He <em><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>has</span></em> been known to officiate at weddings, and students have emerged from his classes with a certain missionary fervor about the relevance of Homer, Thucydides, and Sallust to the present day. But to see Leon as merely an inspired preacher of the gospel of the humanities is to underrate his less-than-clerical gusto for the concrete, the worldly, the physical, and his allergy to dogma of any kind. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>What football and archaeology share is the uniting of the physical with the mental. Archaeology probably involves more physical labor than any other area of academic inquiry. As Leon himself wrote in 1978,  An archaeologist reconstructs man s past by digging physically through his fragmented remains and transfusing meaning into them by the use of the mind. In each instance, the marriage of labor and thought produces happiness and contentment. The generations of students that Leon has tortured by forcing them to excavate god-forsaken Celtic hill forts in July can only nod wearily in agreement. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>As a teacher Leon has little patience with the theories of modern pedagogy. An unrepentant lecturer, he insisted that students memorize, a lot: not just dates, but obscure historical terms, elaborate archaeological ground plans of the Roman forum; the concrete data on which historical inquiry must rest. While most of the educational establishment was busy thinking of new ways to titillate the jaded undergraduate palette, Fitts once summed up his tough love approach,  They have a sense of entitlement; you have to break it. It was tough, and they loved it. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Leon's involvement with students was significant. Many times I have witnessed his former students from the 70s, 80s, and 90s stop by the department unannounced to say hello, reminisce, and catch up. But the real treat was to go abroad with Leon. His appetite for ancient ruins, food, drink, conversation, and laughter created a unique Dickinson experience. Because he treated his students like adults and expected them to act accordingly while abroad, special bonds were created. Some of you faculty in here today can attest to this. There was nothing like searching through the ruins of the Roman Forum or Ostia during the hottest summer day, and then having a wonderful dinner at one of Leon's chosen trattorias, topped off with a gelato. For the intrepid, a nightcap or two with their fearless leader was de rigueur as well. The conversation ranged from the Greeks and Romans to someone's latest romantic involvement. Students never forget such experiences, often saying that these were their most cherished Dickinson memories. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Yet another Fittsian maxim reveals his belief in education beyond the classroom:  If you want to get to know a student, play racquet ball with him. Racquet ball, rather than football, was the destroyer of his much-operated on knees. He gave no more ground on the court than on the football field, however, and at least one student received a black eye during this kind of extra-curricular edification. Life-long friendships started there, and in the trenches at Leon s many summer digs, and on the football field as well, since for years Leon found the time amidst his other responsibilities to coach the Red Devil defensive line. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Not for Leon are the pieties of political correctness. His lovable personality and Texas accent allowed him to get away with comments that would turn most male professors into pariahs. Ladies of all ages drew appreciative, flirtatious remarks. He especially loved to teach the lyrical yet notoriously obscene poet Catullus, translating the obscenities as literally as possible, for sound philological and pedagogical reasons, of course, but with obvious relish. One year he began an introductory lecture with the caveat that he intended to use blunt terms, many of them made up of four letters.  So, if any of y all are offended, he explained,  just raise your hand, [pause]  and I ll ask you to leave the room. At the lectern he was by turns lyrical and crotchety, sublime and gruff. Fulmination and fist pounding were part of the performance, yet he also has a tendency to burst into song and recite Byron or Catullus from memory, to moving effect. So entertaining and polished a lecturer is he that he has lately been approached by The Teaching Company about recording some lectures for their catalogue. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>To know Leon is to understand that his Texan swagger masks a broad and accomplished intellectual. Rambling around the house during a lull in one of the legendary dinner parties that Mary and Leon threw, one always saw a copy of the latest monograph on this or that, or a well-thumbed ancient text sitting next to a pile of notes on an end table. To the extent that Leon can wear anything lightly, he wears his learning so. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>As a department chair his attitude to administrative work was generally of the  ignore it and they will come school of thought. Toss the unwanted memo or email, dodge the meetings long enough, and on the truly important matters someone will ultimately pick up the phone and call. When provoked, however, he could be a fierce advocate for the department and its students, striking terror into the hearts of staff at, say, the Registrar s Office, who were unlucky enough to have picked up the phone when he called. More prudent, younger colleagues were heard at times to wish aloud for a suspension of his email privileges, but they always knew they could count on him when it mattered. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>1996-97 represented something of a low ebb for the classics department; the untimely death of Prof. Mary Moser, a retirement, an adverse tenure decision, and the loss of a position meant that Leon ended up being the sole remaining element of continuity. In those days he routinely taught overloads. He led the charge in obtaining an outside grant for a full-time archaeologist. His efforts resuscitated the classics department and the archaeology program. To younger colleagues he was unfailingly generous, reading articles, and handing over reams of detailed notes. He never pulled rank, and permitted wholesale curricular changes that required him to develop new courses and re-tool in ways that no senior faculty member should be required to do. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Leon Fitts served this college and his department with learning, humor, and dedication, with unfailing generosity, and no fuss. Well, maybe some occasional fuss. Most people who did not work closely with him were just surprised and amused by the idea of a wise-cracking, football-playing classics professor from west Texas. Nowhere else, I suppose, is there such a thorough mixing of ancient languages and athletics in one place. And yet there is something of an analogy in the moniker of the Georgetown Hoyas, which derives from a Greek and Latin tag applied to the dependability of their defensive line, <em><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>hoya saxa</span></em>,  what rocks. I can think of no better exclamation on the occasion of Leon s retirement from Dickinson than to singularize this on behalf of all who did work closely with him and say, <em><span style='font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"'>hoyon saxum</span></em>,  What a rock. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>I will close with some Latin, in a meter of Leon s beloved Catullus: <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Ante greges, Leo, doctorum qui praevius ibis,<br> agmina tironum turbida concilias,<br> ultima sic ducis pulchro sollemnia motu<br> verno ut diligens tempore pastor oves<br> turbidum et audacum compescitur omne parentum <br> vulgus pignoribus qui dant signa suis.<br> Accipe amicorum multum gaudantium grates<br> atque in perpetuum, pater, ave atque vale.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><em><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Leon, you who go in advance before the flocks of the learned, who calm the rowdy ranks of the graduates, you lead the final ceremonies of the year with handsome motion in time of spring, like a careful shepherd leads his sheep, and the whole disorderly throng of parents who give signals to their children is restrained. Accept the thanks of friends greatly rejoicing, and forever, father, hail and be well.</span></em><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'> <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><strong><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'> Written and delivered by Christopher Francese, chair, classical studies, May 15, 2008</span></strong><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'><o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'> Adventuring for a Pot of Gold, <em><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Dickinson College Alumnus</span></em> 55 (1978) 2. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Thanks for this anecdote go to Daniel Heisey, O.S.B., class of 1988, whose tribute to Prof. Fitts, forthcoming on the Dickinson Magazine s web site, I have drawn on at several points.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p> <h2><strong><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"'>Tribute to Gisela Roethke</span></strong><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'>, Dickinson College Faculty Meeting, May 15, 2008 <o:p></o:p></span></h2> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>It is difficult to imagine that this spring semester has been Gisela s last as a member of the German department. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>For those of us who claim Bosler Hall as Home, she has always been there on the first floor, second office on the right. You just needed to knock at the door, and there she was behind a desk covered with all sorts of books, stacks of papers, files, printed out e-mails, and other hard to identify objects she printed out her e-mails never quite trusting those electrons that supposedly store all information. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>And if you had come to her office in her early days& (The early days are the eighties when we had a magician for a president; I am speaking of President Banks who used to entertain his students with magic tricks.) If you had come to her office in those days, you would not really have seen her clearly behind that overloaded desk because she was hidden behind a thick blue cloud of smoke emanating from the cigarettes that she lit casually one after another in the course of a typical day of drilling into students such grammatical gems as the dative case, the passive voice, and the various forms of the subjunctive, while also attempting to make them interested in Greek meter as applied to classical German poetry. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Gisela came to Dickinson in 1985 by way of Boston s Harvard where she wrote her dissertation on the Austrian, Jewish immigrant, Hermann Broch. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Before that, she earned her Master s and BA degrees at Washington State University. After that, she took a four-year excursion to the Middle East where as a young woman and mother married to an American academic, she mingled with locals in Beirut when the city had not yet been ravished by superpower rivalry and inner strife. And while there, she visited several countries around the Mediterranean. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>From this time stems her familiarity with and admiration of Arab and Islamic cultures, something that caused her many years later to develop a course on women and Islam. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>When in 1966 Gisela embarked on a ship (named Argo) leaving from Bremen to cross the Atlantic Ocean because she was to join an exchange program in Pullman, Washington, she thought she was going to stay for a year and then return to her native land. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>But little did she know about the charm of American men and that she would marry, have a son, earn a doctorate from the most prestigious university in the New World, and end up an immigrant in a small south central Pennsylvania town, teach in the oldest American College this side of the Susquehanna River, and become a valued member of a department which educated a most famous German major. I am speaking of <em><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Marion Dexter Learned, </span></em>Dickinson class of 1880, who earned the first PhD in German ever bestowed on a graduate student at Johns Hopkins University. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Crossing borders, Dickinson s  cri de guerre, has been guiding Gisela from early on. She grew up, among other places, in Wittenberg, Wolfsburg, Muenster and Kln, where she received her high school diploma, and in Bonn, where she spent three semesters at the Friedrich Wilhelm University studying German and English literature. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>The difference between Bremen in the North and the Rhineland around Kln and Bonn may seem insignificant from today s American perspective; they are only about five hours apart by train, or 3 if you speed on the Autobahn; however, at that time, in the 1950s, and even in the sixties, the difference between a rather reserved protestant flat land in the north and the hilly, lively Catholic center of the German carnival further south was significant, and I am exaggerating only slightly. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>So moving from one place to the other had consequences. Not as many though, as were connected to her crossing the Atlantic Ocean and crisscrossing the Mediterranean Sea later on. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Carlisle may have looked like an unlikely place for this world traveler to settle. However, Dickinson s openness to new ideas and the College s desire to engage the world in various ways enabled her to interact with colleagues from many corners of the world and to invite and get to know writers from German speaking countries, some of whom became her friends. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>During her career at Dickinson, Prof. Roethke distinguished herself in various ways but none more than in her scholarship. For instance, Michael Ltzeler, one of the most prominent scholars of German literature in this country and the pre-eminent international Broch scholar praised as excellent both her 1990 article on Broch scholarship published in <em><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>German Quarterly</span></em> and her presentation on Broch at the 2001 Yale University symposium, and she published the latter with Camden House. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Crossing borders is not really a technical term used in literary scholarship. Intertextuality is. It denotes a kind of literary border crossing by authors, inspiring the literary scholar to map the connections between various literary and other texts, and Gisela has made these connections between works by Plato and Broch, Broch and Huxley, Frischmuth and Orwell, Frischmuth and Bakhtin, and Wolf and Cixous as she had made connections between the various regions and countries of the world she had visited earlier. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Border crossings also became the focus in her freshmen seminars, in which Gisela explored with her students the immigration of Germans to the US. And inspired by her research on German immigration, she got interested in the immigration of the Roethkes. This interest led to the discovery that there are family ties between the Roethkes of the upper Midwest and the Roethkes in Prussia, a discovery that may have been comforting to this immigrant. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Although Gisela loves to do archival work, and has presented papers at many national and international conferences as well as published a number of articles, she has never been an academic who withdrew to the ivory tower. Rather, she has been engaged in causes dear to her heart. She has worked with a Carlisle African-American woman and taught her how to read, and she has been an activist for peace and the environment and has spoken out for these causes for a long time. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>In her more recent scholarship, she has explored works by major women writers of the twentieth century such as Barbara Frischmuth, Irmtraut Morgner, and Christa Wolf. This shift in her scholarly focus signified another border crossing, as it were, which was followed by joining her second department, Women s Studies. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><strong><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'> Written and delivered by Wolfgang Muller, professor and chair of German, May 15, 2008</span></strong><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'> <o:p></o:p></span></p> <h2><strong><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"'>Tribute to Gisela Roethke</span></strong><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'>, Dickinson College Faculty Meeting, May 15, 2008 <o:p></o:p></span></h2> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Gisela came to women s studies not through her graduate study indeed, at the recent ROWS Symposium, she spoke of the all male world she inhabited when she did her graduate work at Harvard, both in terms of her colleagues and the literary scholarship she encountered there. Rather, she came to the field of women s studies through her own activism and through her friendships and collegial ties here at Dickinson. At the end of the 1980s, she began working with a group of dedicated colleagues with Peggy Garrett at the helm to establish a Women s Studies program here at Dickinson. She participated in two interdisciplinary summer faculty workshops to discuss the shape this program should take, and took part in what I heard was a rather contentious faculty meeting that finally passed the new program. Over the years, she turned her interests ever more to feminist topics, researching the literary uses of the myths of Persephone and Demeter, and cross-listing courses between German and Women s Studies. She also retrained herself to become familiar with the full terrain of women s studies work, in both the social sciences and the humanities, in order to teach the core introductory course in women s studies. Eventually, her academic position was reconfigured from a full-time position in German to one divided 2/3 in German, and 1/3 in Women s Studies. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>It takes courage to become such a migrant between fields in academia. Indeed, despite our push for interdisciplinarity, it sometimes even takes courage to become a migrant between the worlds of Bosler Hall and Denny Hall but this Gisela did, traveling regularly between the two buildings wearing her array of beautiful scarves and carrying her bags of books and papers for the women s studies department coordinator. While teaching in Women s Studies she developed courses as far-ranging as one on  European Feminism and another one on  Women and Islam , and a course on  Women and War , cross-listed between German and Women s Studies. She also took a few turns chairing the department, which meant that those trips to Denny Hall were even more numerous. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Gisela will probably be best remembered within women s studies for her efforts to &nbsp;internationalizing the curriculum, both through topics courses as well as through fostering relationships with colleagues at Bremen and Toulouse universities. Because of Gisela, many faculty here have taken part in summer workshops on feminist studies with faculty from Bremen University. Many of the connections she initiated should eventually result in some faculty exchanges and shared teaching and research opportunities. Indeed and Gisela doesn t know this but it should make her very happy it turns out that our newest hire in women s studies has worked with one of the key feminist scholars from Toulouse, and hopes to develop some summer opportunities focusing on global feminism with her, drawing on the extensive groundwork that Gisela has laid.&nbsp; &nbsp; <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><strong><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Just as German will not be the same with Gisela, nor will women s studies. We all wish her the very best as she carries on her literary research, and as she brings her passions to bear on her anti war and peace activism and her political work. And, we very much hope that she will return regularly for our women s studies research lunches, to share her work, and to keep tabs on our efforts to make women s studies a truly global field. Congratulations, Gisela!</span></strong><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'> <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><strong><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'> Written and delivered by Amy Farrell, professor of American studies, chairperson of women s studies, May 15, 2008</span></strong><span style='font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"'><o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p> <h2><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"'>Tribute to Janet Wright, Dickinson College Faculty Meeting, May 15, 2008 <o:p></o:p></span></h2> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>We owe so much to Janet Wright. She came to Dickinson in 1987, mostly to shore up the teaching in a Biology program that had fallen on hard times. She also arrived at the edge of a sea change in thinking about faculty scholarship. The College is a better place than it was then, and Janet Wright has been a leading force in that transformation. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Janet's teaching proceeds from the conviction that science is important, that everyone deserves to understand it, and that we teachers and our students have the responsibility to communicate it. Good communication is clear, engaging, and economical. She tells her Writing Science News students that &quot;even Nobel science only gets 90 seconds on the evening news. If you have something to say, you should be able to get it across in 90 seconds.&quot; She strongly advised me to stick to a similar principle today. Janet, I'll do my best, but no promises. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Janet's great gift is to see to the heart of an issue, and to find the simplest questions whose answers will lead to resolution. Those answers may not come easily. Concerning a debate on genetically-modified crops, held in Janet's Ecology course, a student remarked, &quot;There's a lot of information out there, and most of it conflicts.&quot; Reviewing a list of 21st century issues that hinge on science, Janet wrote, &quot;Being able to distill the valid information and interpret it may be the most important skills we can give our students. It will be their call.&quot; Although the fate of the planet does in fact hang in the balance, Janet's students can't forget that biology is still a lot of fun. One alum, a talented educator himself, wrote that Janet's &quot;love of the subject oozed and pulsed much like the beautiful slime mold she kept as a pet.&quot; <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Janet is selfless. For many years she taught the first semester of our introductory biology survey course, and did so brilliantly. Over the first decade of her service our number of majors tripled, and most of those were recruited by Janet. Not surprisingly, she received the Dickinson Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1997. But Janet was willing to give up that very successful course when we revised our curriculum a few years later, and threw herself wholeheartedly into the new program. In matters large and small she has given freely. She even wrote our new departmental homepage while away on sabbatical. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Janet takes care of her students. An alum wrote, &quot;my first year at Dickinson was quite rough.... All I really had was Professor Wright's class. I was on Academic Probation, but absolutely loved that class...Professor Wright...gave me the confidence to succeed. She never really let me think there were any other options.....Professor Wright was the baddest lady on the block.&quot; <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Likewise, Janet has been an extraordinary mentor to junior faculty. She could help you to see your own deficiencies so clearly - and yet feel hopeful! I never would have recovered from a disastrous first year of teaching, without her. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Janet is a field biologist. For many years she coordinated our partnership with the Reineman Wildlife Sanctuary, where we maintain a field laboratory. She also built our relationship with the School for Field Studies, and worked to provide opportunities for study abroad in field biology and environmental science. Her own research, and subject of her forthcoming edited book, is the conservation and population biology of the Allegheny woodrat, a threatened mammal that inhabits ridges north of Carlisle. (That's the <u>wood</u>rat, genus <em><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Neotoma</span></em>, not the urban vermin in genus <em><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Rattus</span></em>. For one thing, woodrats have a furry tail. You have to know that, to get the right picture.) Her new book is dedicated to the many students who have worked with her in the field. One, now a graduate student, sent me an X-ray image of one of their woodrats wearing a radio collar in the stomach of a very fat snake. The accompanying story is priceless. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Janet is the Joseph Priestley Professor of Natural Philosophy. Priestley is best known within science for his discovery of oxygen in 1775. He was also a bold and progressive social thinker, and a friend of Benjamin Rush. But less well-known are his qualities that make it especially fitting that Janet has occupied this chair. Priestley was an optimist. He was a voice of reason in times of unreason. He was criticized by his scientific peers for his efforts to popularize science, and to write about it in a way that ordinary people could understand. For his political and religious views, he was forced into exile and settled in Pennsylvania. While Janet has not come under those circumstances, there is yet a connection. In 1997 a profile of her research appeared in the Chronicle of Higher Education. Soon after, a well-known Hoover Institution economist and syndicated pundit seized on this as an example of what's wrong with American education - imagine, a college professor spending time chasing rats over a mountain. Janet took this with good grace. Maybe it was a proud moment. We know that Janet embodies everything that is right with education. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'>Janet reports that her guideline for retirement is, &quot;What would Joe Priestley do?&quot; She is about to vanish over the mountain, South Mountain rather than North Mountain this time. She carries with her our gratitude and deep respect. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p><strong><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'> Written and delivered by Anthony Pires, associate professor and chair of biology, May 15, 2008&nbsp;</span></strong><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif"'><o:p></o:p></span></p> </td> </tr> </table> </td> </tr> <tr style='mso-yfti-irow:1;mso-yfti-lastrow:yes'> <td valign=top style='padding:0in 0in 0in 0in'> <p class=MsoNormal align=center style='text-align:center'><span style='font-family:"Arial","sans-serif";mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'>Dickinson College, PO Box 1773, Carlisle, PA 17013, 717-243-5121</span><span style='mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'><o:p></o:p></span></p> </td> </tr> </table> </td> </tr> </table> </div> <p class=MsoNormal><span style='mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p> </div> </body> </html>